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Photos from the 1959 World Series, L.A.'s First

Coliseum (header)
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When the team was new to Los Angeles, fans had only to wait one year; the Dodgers won the National League pennant in 1959, only their second season in California, and from October 1-8 battled the Chicago White Sox for the world championship. As the photographs here – from the USC Libraries' regional history collections – show, things have changed. Fashions both on and off the field were different, temperatures were in the double-digits, and the Dodgers then called the cavernous Coliseum home, which welcomed sell-out crowds of more than 92,000 in games three, four, and five. The Dodgers then flew to Chicago for game six, which they won, 9-3, clinching the series four games to two and securing the first of many world championships for the City of Angels.

The Dodgers and White Sox line up for the national anthem before game 3 of the 1959 World Series.
The Dodgers and White Sox line up for the national anthem before game 3 of the 1959 World Series.
A full Coliseum for the 1959 World Series
More than 92,000 filled the cavernous Coliseum for games 3-5 of the 1959 World Series.
A baseball diamond fit poorly within the confines of the Coliseum
A baseball diamond fit poorly within the confines of the Coliseum.
Binoculars and sunglasses were ubiquitous accessories at the 1959 World Series
Binoculars and sunglasses were ubiquitous accessories at the 1959 World Series. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Examiner Collection, USC Libraries.
Transistor radios were another popular accessory.
Transistor radios were another popular accessory. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Examiner Collection, USC Libraries.
Hats
Hats. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Examiner Collection, USC Libraries.
A woman cheers
A Dodger fan. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Examiner Collection, USC Libraries.
A young Dodger fan.
A young Dodger fan. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Examiner Collection, USC Libraries.
The Dodgers score in the 1959 World Series
The Dodgers score in the 1959 World Series. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Examiner Collection, USC Libraries.

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Photographic portrait of Mrs. Arcadia de Baker; previously Mrs. Abel Stearns, Arcadia Bandini, ca.1885. She can be seen from the waist up turned slightly to the left in an oval cutout. Her long dark hair is parted up the middle and pulled back to her neck. She is wearing a frilly shawl over a frilly dress with a low neckline.

The Powerful Mexican Woman Who Helped Shape Early Santa Monica

Arcadia Bandini Stearns de Baker was rich, beautiful and connected. This savvy businesswoman would be an important player in early California and helped shape Santa Monica and the west side of Los Angeles.
A black and white photo depicts a row of cabins are arranged in a line along a steep slope. Each one is affixed with screened porches.

They Built This City: How Labor Exploitation Built L.A.'s Attractions

In the early 1900s, Los Angeles’ temperate climate and natural attractions drew droves of tourists seeking an escape from crowded, industrial cities. But behind the pristine curtain of Mt. Lowe’s tourism industry was a harsh reality of labor exploitation that continues to disproportionately affect Los Angeles’ Latinx population today.
An African American man holds a record while leaning on a music booth.

Before Motown: L.A.'s Black-Owned Soul Music Empire

During the 1950s and 1960s, Los Angeles had its own Motown records — Dootone Records. The label's owner, Dootsie Williams, was a trailblazing Black music executive and entrepreneur who not only left an impact on the music industry, but also in his community.