Muhammad Ali

Muhammad Ali

Start watching
SoCal Update

SoCal Update

Start watching
a large damn with graffiti of a woman with a hammer on it, mountains in the background

Earth Focus Presents

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
Professor T

Professor T (Belgium)

Start watching
Artbound

Artbound

Start watching
Emma

Emma

Start watching
Guilt

Guilt

Start watching
Line of Separation Key Art.

Line of Separation

Start watching
Us

Us

Start watching
The Latino Experience

The Latino Experience

Start watching
Key Art of "Summer of Rockets" featuring Keeley Hawes and Toby Stephens.

Summer of Rockets

Start watching
Death in Paradise Series 10

Death in Paradise

Start watching
millionaire still

KCET Must See Movies

Start watching
Independent Lens

Independent Lens

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Earth Focus

Earth Focus

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.

When Knott’s Berry Farm Was an Actual Farm

Knott's Berry Farm (header)
Support Provided By

Orange County was more farmland than suburb – a landscape of orange groves and cow pastures rather than tract houses and fairy-tale castles – when Walter Knott opened his first roadside produce stand in 1923. The dusty highway passing through Knott’s berry farm was fast becoming the principal route between Los Angeles and the beach cities of the Orange Coast, and shore-bound motorists discovered the farmer’s humble wooden shack – located near the midpoint of their drive – as a place to momentarily escape the automobile and sample Knott’s farm-fresh berries and preserves.

As traffic increased, the enterprising farmer expanded his roadside accommodations. In 1928 Knott replaced the rustic shack with a stucco building that housed a tea room and berry market, stocked with Knott's famous boysenberries (a locally invented hybrid). Later, Depression-era financial hardship forced Walter’s wife Cordelia to open Mrs. Knott’s Chicken Dinner Restaurant next door. Serving fried chicken and warm berry pies, the restaurant became so popular – in 1940 it averaged 4,000 chicken dinners each Sunday – that the Knotts began adding diversions to entertain the hungry crowds. A 20-foot artificial volcano belched steam from its summit. A Ghost Town Village reproduced (in sentimentalized form) the frontier settlements of the American West. Rides soon followed. By the time visitors started paying an admission fee in 1968, suburbia had displaced arcadia in Buena Park, and Knott’s had become a farm in name only.

Knott's Berry Farm roadside fruit stand, circa 1926
Knott's Berry Farm's humble origins? A roadside fruit stand along the highway between Los Angeles and the beach. Circa 1926 photo courtesy of the Orange County Archives.
Knott's Berry Place, circa 1933
In 1928, Knott replaced his wooden roadside stand with a more permanent stucco building. He continued to sell fresh berries and preserves, but now also offered berry plants to his customer from his nursery. Circa 1933 photo courtesy of the Orange County Archives.
Walter Knott with his famous boysenberries
Walter Knott, pictured here in 1948, popularized the boysenberry, a hybrid fruit first cultivated in nearby Anaheim by Charles Rudolph Boysen. Photo courtesy of the Orange County Archives.

Ghost Town, Knott's Berry Farm, 1940s
By the 1940s, Knott had built a sentimentalized version of a frontier town, his Ghost Town, to entertain diners as they waited for his wife's famous chicken dinner. Photo courtesy of the Orange County Archives.
Aerial view of Knott's Berry Farm, 1937
Aerial view of Knott's Berry Farm in 1937, courtesy of the Orange County Archives.
Aerial view of Knott's Berry Farm, 1961
Aerial view of Knott's Berry Farm in 1961, far into its evolution from actual farm concern to amusement park, courtesy of the Orange County Archives.
Replica of Knott's Berry Farm roadside stand
Decades later, Cordelia and Walter Knott stand outside a replica of one of their early roadside fruit stands in this undated photo courtesy of the Orange County Archives.

This article first appeared on Los Angeles magazine's website on October 16, 2013. It has been updated here with additional images.

Support Provided By
Read More
A view of the iconic landmark, the Bradbury Building, showing dark, ornamental grilling and brickwork and layers of stairs.

The Savvy Mexican Businesswoman Behind the Iconic Bradbury Building

While the building’s namesake Lewis Bradbury is often referenced in historical accounts, his wife Simona is rarely mentioned alongside him even though she oversaw his business affairs after his death, including the completion of the iconic Bradbury Building.
Photographic portrait of Mrs. Arcadia de Baker; previously Mrs. Abel Stearns, Arcadia Bandini, ca.1885. She can be seen from the waist up turned slightly to the left in an oval cutout. Her long dark hair is parted up the middle and pulled back to her neck. She is wearing a frilly shawl over a frilly dress with a low neckline.

The Powerful Mexican Woman Who Helped Shape Early Santa Monica

Arcadia Bandini Stearns de Baker was rich, beautiful and connected. This savvy businesswoman would be an important player in early California and helped shape Santa Monica and the west side of Los Angeles.
A black and white photo depicts a row of cabins are arranged in a line along a steep slope. Each one is affixed with screened porches.

They Built This City: How Labor Exploitation Built L.A.'s Attractions

In the early 1900s, Los Angeles’ temperate climate and natural attractions drew droves of tourists seeking an escape from crowded, industrial cities. But behind the pristine curtain of Mt. Lowe’s tourism industry was a harsh reality of labor exploitation that continues to disproportionately affect Los Angeles’ Latinx population today.