LOST LA “Griffith Park: The Untold History”

Now in its fourth season, "Lost LA" explores our region’s hidden past through documents, photos and other rare artifacts from California libraries and archives. This season, discover the untold histories behind Griffith Park, Manzanar, Los Angeles’ prohibition tunnels, architect Paul Revere Williams, the Shindana Toy Company and the Mount Wilson Observatory.

"Lost LA" airs Tuesdays at 8:30 p.m. on KCET in Southern California with encores airing one week later on PBS SoCal at 7:30 p.m.  Each episode will stream here following the broadcast and on the free PBS Video app (available on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, the App Store and Google Play), as well as on YouTube and Amazon Prime.

"Lost LA" explores the past through the region's archives, where photos, documents, and other rare artifacts unlock the untold history behind the fantasy of Southern California. Hosted by writer and public historian Nathan Masters of the USC Libraries, each episode of "Lost LA" brings the primary sources of history to the screen in surprising new ways. Much of L.A.'s past is lost to history, but through the region's archives we can uncover the inspiring dreams and bitter realities that built the modern-day metropolis.

 

FUNDERS | LOST LA CURRICULUM PROJECT

Full Episodes

Upcoming Airdates

Desert Fantasy

California’s deserts have sparked the imaginations of millions of people around the world. From the famously alien landscape of Joshua Tree to the wide expanses of seemingly empty land, the desert has been seen as a place of reinvention, a blank slate on which the visitor creates his or her own dream. This episode explores the man-made natural disaster that created the Salton Sea, the efforts to preserve Joshua Tree National Park, and how commercial interests and real estate developers created a desert utopia like Palm Springs.

  • 2021-01-23T11:30:00-08:00
    KCET-HD

Beach Culture

One of Southern California’s great international exports has been its beach culture. This episode explores how surfers, bodybuilders and acrobats taught Californians how to have fun and stay young at the beach — and how the 1966 documentary “The Endless Summer” shared the Southern California idea of the beach with the rest of the world.

  • 2021-01-30T11:30:00-08:00
    KCET-HD

Paul Revere Williams: An African-American Architect in Jet-Age L.A.

Although best known for designing the homes of celebrities like Lucille Ball and Frank Sinatra, the pioneering African-American architect Paul Revere Williams also contributed to some of the city’s most recognizable civic structures — all while confronting racial barriers.

  • 2021-02-06T10:00:00-08:00
    KCET-HD

Shindana Toy Company: Changing the American Doll Industry

The Watts riots (also known as the Watts Uprising) left South Los Angeles in social and economic distress. In its wake, Operation Bootstrap, a non-profit community-based organization was formed, with hopes of facilitating change through community empowerment. This episode explores the lasting impact of one Operation Bootstrap initiative, the Shindana Toy Company, which left a lasting mark on the American doll industry by manufacturing ethnically correct black dolls.

  • 2021-02-06T10:30:00-08:00
    KCET-HD