88 Hours Meltdown

Living Ninja Legend Masaaki Hatsumi

Masaaki Hatsumi, 84 years old, is a living ninja in modern times. He is the grandmaster of Togakure-ryu, a ninjutsu school that was founded about 900 years ago, and has drawn attention from the FBI and other government agencies as they train in survival skills and how to dodge enemy attacks and save one’s life. Hatsumi’sdisciples and followers are estimated at more than 100,000 around the world. His ninjutsu is now even taught at the university in California as a regular course. At age of 27, Hatsumibecame an apprentice of a ninjutsu mentor and inherited the position after 15 years of grueling training. He bolstered his reputation during his journey abroad, with fierce fighters and soldiersbeing no match for him. We will look at the life of the world-renowned grandmaster and his legendary techniques.

Upcoming Airdates

Nike's Backstory: Unknown Bonds with Japan

We pursue the story behind the global company Nike's beginnings and how the bold spirit of Japanese trading company employees provided vital support when it nearly went under more than 40 years ago.

  • 2018-08-24T05:00:00-07:00
    KCET-HD

Seasoning The Seasons Special: Hawaii Part 1

This program visits places across Japan to introduce the charms of their local daily life and festivals fostered by the nation's long history. Today, the special: JAPANESE Americans in HAWAII, Part 1.

  • 2018-08-31T05:00:00-07:00
    KCET-HD

Seasoning The Seasons Special: Hawaii Part 2

This program visits places across Japan to introduce the charms of their local daily life and festivals fostered by the nation's long history. Today, the special: JAPANESE Americans in HAWAII, Part 2.

  • 2018-09-07T05:00:00-07:00
    KCET-HD

What You Taught Me About My Son

In 2007, a young Japanese with severe autism wrote a book titled The Reason I Jump. Authored by Naoki Higashida, it reveals the inner heart of a person with autism and has become an international bestseller translated into over 20 languages. This success is due to author David Mitchell, who has an autistic son. Having had experience living in Japan, David could read the book in Japanese and felt that his own son was speaking to him through Naoki’s words, providing insight into such behaviors as head banging and uncontrolled vocalization.

  • 2018-09-14T05:00:00-07:00
    KCET-HD