Key Art of "Summer of Rockets" featuring Keeley Hawes and Toby Stephens.

Summer of Rockets

Start watching
6HWbNHN-show-poster2x3-c7tgE2Y.png

Artbound

Start watching
FZG3mkG-show-poster2x3-nOossfs.png

SoCal Update

Start watching
millionaire still

KCET Must See Movies

Start watching
MZihTLV-show-poster2x3-5CKaGu8.jpg

Independent Lens

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
HvlSxHY-show-poster2x3-4ik43uV.png

Earth Focus

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.

Recipe: Maialino Style Pork Ragu with Broken Lasagna

Support Provided By
Maialino Style Pork Ragu with Broken Lasagna
Maialino Style Pork Ragu with Broken Lasagna

This recipe is courtesy of saramoulton.com

Maialino Style Pork Ragu with Broken Lasagna

Serves 6 to 8:  Makes 12 cups meat and sauce

Maialino Restaurant in New York City serves this hearty pork ragu as a sauce for dried lasagna pasta that has been broken into 3-inch pieces. It’s unusual in that it has no tomatoes–just onion, celery and fennel seeds for flavor. At the end of the cooking, the meat is torn into small pieces and tossed with the cooked pasta, grated cheese and fresh arugula for a little color and texture. Michele adapted this recipe from one that appeared in The New York Times.

This makes a lot of sauce.  If you don’t want to use it all at once, pack some of the sauce away in the freezer for another meal.  Note that it is also good with polenta or cooked beans instead of the pasta.

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds bone in pork shoulder
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium white onion, peeled and cut into large pieces
  • 1 rib celery, cut into large pieces
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 4 cups Chicken Broth
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 pound dried pasta, such as broken lasagne
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 cups trimmed baby arugula
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

To Prepare

Using a sharp knife, remove the thick skin from the pork, leaving a small amount of fat on top of the meat. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place the pork in a large slow cooker.

In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat.  Add the onion, celery and fennel seeds. Cook until the vegetables are softened, about 10 minutes.  Add the broth and thyme and bring it to a simmer. Add the contents of the skillet to the slow cooker. The meat should be almost covered by the liquid.  If not, add some water.Cover and cook on low until the meat just begins to pull away from the bone, and a small sharp knife inserted in the meat comes out easily, 8 to 10 hours.

Place the meat on a cutting board. With two forks, tear the meat into bite size pieces and discard the bones. Place the meat in a bowl. Strain the cooking liquid into another bowl. Skim off the excess fat. Discard the solids. Pour enough of the liquid over the pork to cover the meat. (Use the remainder for soup or stews.) When ready to serve, reheat the pork in its liquid in a large pot. Simmer until the liquid is slightly reduced.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to boiling over high heat. Add the pasta and salt to taste. Cook, stirring often, until the pasta is tender yet firm to the bite.  Drain well. Add the pasta to the pot with the meat. Add the butter and cheese and stir well. Stir in the arugula. Serve immediately. 

Support Provided By
Up Next
Read More
An asymmetrical ceramic dish holds a small, bite-sized piece of white steamed fish sitting in a thin, broth-y sauce. The fish is topped with a fine green powder. Additionally, someone is pouring more of the sauce from a small ceramic container.

Michelin Star Chef Finds Confidence in the Flavors of His Taiwanese Upbringing

Los Angeles' Kato Restaurant, where the dishes are edible mnemonic devices for Asian Americans, is an homage to Chef Jon Yao's Taiwanese heritage.
A coloring page created by the Los Angeles Public Library's Octavia Lab. An illustration of Manuela C. García sitting next to a phonograph. Behind her is a faint sheet music background.

Manuela C. García, the Voice Behind a Treasure Trove of Old Mexican Songs

Born in Los Angeles in the late 1860s, Manuela C. García is the voice behind over 100 songs in Charles Lummis' recordings of Southwest musical heritage. Known mostly by historians specializing in 19th-century Mexican American music, her voice connects California's present musical history with its past.
A sign for Pine Ave Pier in Long Beach, California.

Where to Explore L.A.'s Most Fascinating Piers, Both Past and Present

As Los Angeles heads into the summer, find some time to see this historical piers and beaches across the county.