still image from socal connected channel islands

Are We Loving Our National Parks a Little Too Much?

Americans love their national parks. Over 330 million recreational visits were made to parks across the country, making 2016 a record setting year. In California, several of the state's 28 national parks set attendance records in 2016, with Yosemite being the third most visited park nationwide. The visits are tracked by the National Park Service's Visitor User Statistics, which recorded at 7.72% increase in attendance from 2015.

All that love from park visitors can create a strain for park officials, whose mandate it is to  provide both the public with access to the nation's parks and protect natural and cultural resources.

"We know people have meaningful experiences in parks, but how do we maintain that excitement in ways that lead to more conversation buy-in?" asks Dr. Ryan Sharp, a professor of recreation management at Kansas State University.

Sharp consults with NPS officials on the best ways to balance the public's love of parks with the need to protect and preserve those parks. In this KCET slideshow, he offers his concerns and advice on how to not to love our parks to death.

 

(Slideshow created by Dennis Nishi)

Music: "Contradictions" by Airtone and Duncan_beattie, Creative Commons.

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S8 E2: Coastal Housing Crisis

SUBSTANDARD OF LIVING

In this episode, SoCal Connected's Deepa Dernandes meets with Dario Pini, a landlord who calls himself a savior of Santa Barbara’s working class, but the City—and many of his tenants—have a different take on Pini. SoCal Connected looks at whether this self-proclaimed savior is actually a slumlord, and why it's taken officials nearly three decades to stop him.


BACK FROM THE BRINK

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SoCal Connected

They’re tiny, weaponized, and carry a potentially deadly payload. They’re called “Assassin Bugs” and they can be as common as the backyard mosquito or as exotic as the so-called “kissing bug"--and they're here in Southern California, spreading some of the deadliest - and neglected- diseases in the world. a group of children with facial birthmarks and deformities receive a life changing experience thanks to the efforts of a team of volunteer doctors and nurses.

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SoCal Connected

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SoCal Connected

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SoCal Connected

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