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Metrolink Announces New Air Filters as Part of COVID-19 Efforts

Metrolink trains in Los Angeles, California on Thursday, February 20, 2014. | Scott Varley/Digital First Media/Torrance Daily Breeze via Getty Images
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LOS ANGELES (CNS) - Metrolink today announced the addition of new, state-of-the-art antimicrobial air filters on all its train cars to ensure cleaner air for its passengers.

Built by Purafil, the new PuraShield air filters destroy airborne microbials on contact, officials said. The filters screen out 99.99% of the staphylococcus bacteria, 99.91% of the H1N1 virus, 99.96% of E. Coli bacteria and 99.58% of the SARS virus, according to Metrolink.

“With every passing day, we learn more about ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and take necessary steps to keep our riders and employees safe aboard our trains,'' Metrolink Board Chair Brian Humphrey said.

“Understanding the airborne nature of COVID-19, we installed new state-of-the- art air filters that improve the air flow aboard our trains and destroy 99.9% of impurities. Together with enhanced cleaning, physical distancing and our face mask requirement, this new step reduces the exposure risk of infection.”

The filters work through a high-efficiency fiber treated with a proprietary antimicrobial technology. That technology involves copper and silver ions jointly attacking the viral and bacterial cells, weakening the cell walls, then sterilizing, suffocating and starving the pathogens.

The new filters work with Metrolink's Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning system, which is itself another protective layer. Intake vents draw in outside air, send it through the HVAC system, then distribute the filtered and cleaned air into the cars. Through this process, the filters screen out and kill not only viral and bacterial particles, but biological and atmosphere odors, hopefully providing a more pleasant experience for riders.

In March, the regional rail service began implementing a new multi- faceted health and safety program to keep riders and Metrolink employees safe during the COVID-19 pandemic. These efforts include a face-mask requirement at station platforms and aboard trains, enhanced cleaning and sanitizing measures, and partnerships with leading health and safety institutions for guidance on health matters.

For more information, visit metrolinktrains.com/health-safety.

Top Image: Metrolink trains in Los Angeles, California on Thursday, February 20, 2014. | Scott Varley/Digital First Media/Torrance Daily Breeze via Getty Images

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