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Newly Released Images of Tent City Housing Migrant Children

Bunk Beds in a detention center in Texas | Administration for Children and Families at HHS
Bunk beds in a detention center in Texas | Administration for Children and Families at HHS
Administration for Children and Families at HHS
Detention center in Texas for migrant children | Administration for Children and Families at HHS
Detention Facility in Texas | Administration for Children and Families at HHS
Detention Facility in Texas | Administration for Children and Families at HHS
Administration for Children and Families at HHS
Detention center for immigrant children in Texas | Administration for Children and Families at HHS
Medic at a detention city in Texas
Medic at a detention center in Texas | Administration for Children and Families at HHS
Detention Facility Adjacent to Marcelino Serna Port of Entry at Tornillo, TX.
Detention facility adjacent to Marcelino Serna Port of entry at Tornillo, TX | Administration for Children and Families at HHS

 

Images have just been released of a tent facility built in Tornillo, Texas which may be used to accommodate dozens of teenagers, some of whom have been separated from the parents. The facility sits thirty miles northwest of El Paso and is adjacent to the Marcelino Serna Port of Entry. 

The photos, which were taken last week, were released today by the Administration for Children and Families at Health and Human Services and show tents with air conditioning systems and a series of bunk beds.

Each tent can sleep up to twenty children. A spokesman for HHS confirmed the tent facility is open.

Over the weekend, hundreds of people marched from El Paso to the tent facility, protesting the separation of the migrant children from their parents.

 

Editorial Note: The Department of Health and Human Services has not allowed media outlets to record visual or audio material from within these facilities. 

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