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KCET's Lost LA Curriculum Project Launch

On the afternoon of Sunday, June 9, more than 100 guests joined KCET at the Mark Taper Auditorium at the Los Angeles Central Library for a special event celebrating the launch of the LOST LA Curriculum Project. The basis of the third and final talk of the 27th Annual Marie Northrop Lecture Series, the event was co-produced by our station partner, the Los Angeles City Historical Society. The afternoon began with a screening of the “Borderlands” episode of the award-winning "Lost LA" series, followed by a panel discussion that tracked the journey of the project from story idea to a teachable curriculum. Moderated by L.A. City Archivist Michael Holland, the panel featured series executive producer Matthew Crotty, as well as Daniel Diaz, Director, UCLA History-Geography project and Emily Waldron, high school History and Ethnic Studies teacher at El Rancho High School, educators who were part of the team that created the Lost LA curriculum. Following the panel discussion, Emily Waldron presented a lesson based on “Borderlands” which had the audience break into groups to discuss the history of the episode they had just viewed. A lively Q&A with the panel ended the afternoon.

See event photos below.

Audience shares their answers to the Curriculum questions for “Borderlands” episode of LOST LA
Audience shares their answers to the Curriculum questions for “Borderlands” episode of LOST LA
Emily Waldron, High School History and Ethnic Studies teacher at El Rancho High School; Daniel Diaz, Director, UCLA History-Geography project; LA City Archivist Michael Holland; LOST LA Executive Producer Matthew Crotty, Sr. Director, Production, PMGSC
Emily Waldron, High School History and Ethnic Studies teacher at El Rancho High School; Daniel Diaz, Director, UCLA History-Geography project; LA City Archivist Michael Holland; LOST LA Executive Producer Matthew Crotty, Sr. Director, Production, PMGSC

 

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