Fall Recipe: Austrian Potato Salad

I love mashed potatoes so much. They are, without any question, my favorite part of the Thanksgiving meal.

But, I also love all things vinegar. I've been eyeing this recipe from America's Test Kitchen for Austrian Potato Salad (what's the difference between Austrian and German potato sald? I'm not sure, though this one is bacon-less) and I think it'll make an appearance in the coming week, whether it's on the Thanksgiving table or made in the days after with leftover tubers.

Use Yukon Gold potatoes if you can, as they're the creamiest, and don't be stingy with the salt. Happy eating!

Photo courtesy America's Test KitchenAustrian Potato Salad
Serves 8
2 lbs Yukon Gold potatoes (about 4 large) peeled, quartered lengthwise, and cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth (or vegetable, if need be)
1 cup water
1 tsp salt plus more to taste
1 tbsp sugar
2 tbsps white wine vinegar
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 small red onion, chopped fine (about 3/4 cup)
6 cornichons, minced (about 2 tablespoons)
2 tbsps minced fresh chives
ground black pepper to taste

Bring potatoes, broth, water, 1 teaspoon salt, sugar, and 1 tablespoon vinegar to a boil in 12-inch heavy-bottomed skillet over high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and cook until potatoes offer no resistance when pierced, 15 to 17 minutes. Remove cover, increase heat to high, and cook 2 minutes.

Drain potatoes in colander set over large bowl, reserving cooking liquid. Set drained potatoes aside. Pour off and discard all but ½ cup cooking liquid (if ½ cup liquid does not remain, add water to make ½ cup). Whisk remaining tablespoon vinegar, mustard, and oil into cooking liquid.

Add ½ cup cooked potatoes to bowl with cooking liquid mixture and mash with potato masher or fork until thick sauce forms (mixture will be slightly chunky). Add remaining potatoes, onion, cornichons, and chives, folding gently with rubber spatula to combine. Season to taste with plenty of salt and black pepper. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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About the Author

Katherine's role as the Living editor at KCET.org keeps her running from farms to markets to restaurants to pop-up swaps all over SoCal. She's been living in and writing about this area for over a decade.
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