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A Summery Barbecue Menu for Father's Day

Why do we so often associate Father's Day with barbecue? It's certainly true for my family — my father and brother-in-law would much rather hang out back by the barbecue pit than deal with the crowds on the day. It's also an excuse for the rest of us to indulge in summery picnic foods out in the yard.

Wherever and however you choose to celebrate, these recipes will definitely satisfy dads on Sunday. Three cheers for dads!

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1. The Laredo

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The Laredo is a refreshing, simple (just use fancy ingredients!) cocktail from the relatively new Willie Jane in Venice, a restaurant run by celebrity chef Govind Armstrong. It's hot out again, so it's the perfect time for a drink like this. (And don't tell Govind, but we might add a splash or two of club soda!) Find the full recipe here.

2. Darjeeling-Infused Gin with Blackberries and Mint

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It's really starting to heat up, and this sophisticated drink is just the thing to help cool you down. You can call it a cocktail, you can call it iced tea (since June is National Iced Tea Month after all), but whatever you decide, bartender Matthew Biancaniello's refreshing and colorful concoction will certainly be a crowd pleaser! Find the full recipe here.

3. Sichuan Peppercorn Peanuts

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As Michael Natkin of Herbivoracious explains, Sichuan peppercorns aren't spicy in the traditional sense. They do jump on your tongue in a somewhat startling way, though — it's definitely something worth checking out, and this snack is the perfect vehicle for them. Have a drink on hand to help soothe the spice! Find the full recipe here.

4. Sprouted Wheat Berry Salad

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If you've ever had sprouted grains such as wheat, spelt, or farro, you'll know that they are wonderfully chewy with a sweet, nutty flavor. They also don't require any cooking, so you can eat them raw in dishes such as this fresh, Mediterranean-inspired salad. Add some grilled meat or vegetables on the side and you have a excellent summer meal. Find the full recipe here.

5. Barbecued Burnt Ends

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Traditionally, barbecued burnt ends come from the fatty, point-cut brisket, but to adapt to the leaner flat-cut brisket that's more commonly available, "Cook's Country" cuts the meat into strips and brines it to maximize moisture and flavor. This recipe will save you a trip to Missouri — the spicy, tangy sauce will still remind you of Kansas City-style barbecue! Find the full recipe here.

6. Jerk Chicken

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No two jerk chicken recipes ever taste the same. It's a dish that truly reflects the history of the Caribbean diaspora — you can see that in the list of ingredients. But as long as it has that combination of fragrant spice, sweetness, heat, and smokiness — as this America's Test Kitchen recipes does, we can't complain. Serve the chicken over rice and peas! Find the full recipe here.

7. Chorizo-Stuffed Chile Relleno

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This blend of Spanish and African flavors, with the dates and sweetness in the stuffing, is a chef's favorite at LACMA's Ray's & Stark Bar. The best part is the homemade chorizo, which has just a hint of cinnamon. It's very easy to make! Find the full recipe here.

8. Rich Chocolate Tart

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Most people wouldn't refuse a chocolate dessert, but your guests will be extra impressed by the silky texture of this chocolate tart. The folks at America's Test Kitchen share their secret: bake the tart at a low, gentle temperature to ensure a smooth filling. Find the full recipe here.

9. Maple Bourbon Peach Crumble

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Whether it's served hot out of the oven or as chilled leftovers the next day, a peach crumble or crisp is the perfect relaxed, easy-to-make-and-serve summer treat. This one is lightly sweetened with maple syrup and a splash of bourbon and features a nutty, gluten-free topping. Find the full recipe here.

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